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Burnt Caramel Sauce

Who would want to burn anything? Master chocolatier Michael Recchiuti knows that burning sugar brings out a great flavor. Pour this sauce over ice cream, brownies, chocolate cake or use as a flavoring for ganache or mousse. Michael talks about caramel in our Chocolate Masters Hangout.

By Michael Recchiuti

Burnt Caramel Sauce

Michael Recchiuti and Fran Gage | Chocolate Obsession: Confections and Treats to Create and Savor | Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2005

Yield: About 3 cups

Ingredients

2 cups (16 ounces) granulated cane sugar
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons (9 ounces) heavy whipping cream
1/2 cup (5-1/3 ounces by weight) light corn syrup
10 tablespoons (5 ounces) unsalted butter with 82% butterfat, at room temperature

Method

AUTHOR’S NOTE: The caramelized sugar smokes and sputters when the cream is added, so turn on the exhaust fan in your kitchen when making the sauce. Be very careful, too, as the sugar is extremely hot. Corn syrup is often added to sugar before cooking to prevent crystallization, but in this instance, it is added later, which speeds up caramelization.

1) Put the sugar in a medium heavy-bottomed pot. Use an unlined copper pot if you have one. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon, until the sugar melts. Then continue to cook, without stirring, until the sugar turns black, about 10 minutes. If any crystals form on the sides of the pan, wash them down with a wet pastry brush. Just before it turns black, the sugar syrup may foam up. If it does, reduce the heat to low and, wearing an oven mitt, carefully stir it down. When the sugar syrup is ready, it will smoke and large bubbles will break on the surface.

2) While the sugar is cooking, bring the cream to a boil in a small saucepan over medium heat. When the sugar is black, remove the pot from the heat and carefully stir in the corn syrup. Put a sieve or splatter guard over the pot. Wearing an oven mitt, slowly pour the hot cream into the sugar syrup a little at a time. The mixture will sputter and foam. Be careful, as it is very hot. Whisk in the butter.

3) Pour the finished sauce into a bowl and let cool for about 5 minutes before using. If not using immediately, let it cool to room temperature, pour into a jar, cover and refrigerate. It will keep for at least 1 month. It may separate under storage; simply stir it to recombine. To reheat, stir over low heat.

Chocolate Obsession: Confections and Treats to Create and Savor © 2005Michael Recchiuti and Fran Gage.
Photo © Maren Caruso. All rights reserved.


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