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Raspberry Wasabi Truffle

The G pectin called for in this recipe was originally developed and sold by the author, but has since been taken over by chefrubber.com, an online food emporium that carries just about anything the creative candy cook needs. To get the desired results for the raspberry pâte de fruit, Shotts says the G pectin needs to be cooked for “120 seconds longer” than called for in the instructions.

By Andrew Garrison Shotts

Raspberry Wasabi Truffle

Andrew Garrison Shotts | Making Artisan Chocolates: Flavor-infused Chocolates, Truffles and Confections | Quarry Books , 2007

“This flavor combination is one of my new favorites. When I first made it, I was pleasantly surprised by the way the flavors complemented each other. The slight sting of the wasabi is nicely balanced by the sweetness and acidity of the raspberry. This recipe is slightly more difficult to make than others, as it uses a pâte de fruit or a fruit jelly layer. The results, however, are well worth the extra effort. Use G pectin, a custom-formulated pectin that I developed. Regular pectin from the grocery store will not produce the desired consistency needed for the pâte de fruit to hold its shape. lf you like the combination of raspberry with milk chocolate, you can also omit the wasabi from the recipe. Likewise, you can substitute fresh lemon zest for wasabi; just remember to strain the cream before making the ganache.” – Andrew Garrison Shotts

Yield: 42

Ingredients

For raspberry purée
1 lb. (453g) fresh or frozen raspberries, thawed
7 tbsps. (42g) confectioners' sugar

For raspberry pâte de fruit
1/2 cup (119g) raspberry purée
1/2 cup (119 g) granulated sugar
2 tbsps. (14g) G pectin

For raspberry ganache
5 1/4 oz. (147g) 38 percent milk chocolate, chopped
3/4 oz. (21g) 61 percent dark chocolate, chopped
1/4 cup (56g) heavy cream
1 tsp. (7g) light corn syrup
2 1/2 tbsps. (28g) raspberry purée
1 1/2 tsps. (7g) salted butter, cubed, soft but not melted
1 tbsp. (7g) raspberry liqueur
Pinch wasabi powder

For the foot
5 1/4 oz. (147g) 61 percent bittersweet dark chocolate, melted

To dip and decorate chocolates
2 lbs. (900g) 61 percent dark chocolate, tempered (see instructions)

Method

To make the raspberry purée: Combine the raspberries and sugar in a food processor. Process the fruit on a low speed until completely liquid. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and keep refrigerated until ready to use.

To make the raspberry pâte de fruit: Place the purée and half of the sugar in a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan. ln a separate bowl, whisk together the other half of the sugar with the G pectin. Heat the purée mixture over medium heat while whisking vigorously. Once the mixture comes to a boil, whisk in the g pectin mixture. Continue to whisk, allowing mixture to come to a second boil. Whisk for 2 minutes more and remove from heat. Pour directly into an 8-inch square pan sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Shake the pan to spread the pâte de fruit into all the crevices. Chill for 20 minutes in the refrigerator. After 20 minutes, let the pan sit at room temperature.

To make the ganache: Combine the chopped chocolates in a medium-size bowl and set aside. Combine the heavy cream, corn syrup, and raspberry purée in a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan and cook over medium-high heat. Stir until the mixture comes to a full boil. Immediately pour onto the chocolate. Stir to combine. Using a candy thermometer placed in the center of the bowl, check the temperature. Once the ganache has reached 95°F (35°C), stir in the butter, raspberry liquor, and wasabi powder. Immediately pour directly over the raspberry pâte de fruit layer. Spread evenly using a small offset spatula, knocking the pan if necessary to release any trapped air bubbles. Place the ganache in the freezer for 1 hour. Once the ganache is firm, remove from the freezer.

To add the foot: Remove the ganache from the pan by picking up both sides of the plastic wrap. Gently transfer the ganache onto a baking sheet covered with a clean sheet of parchment paper so the ganache is still on top. Heat the foot chocolate in the microwave on 50 percent power for 20 seconds at a time, until it is completely melted. To create a foot, spread a thin layer of the melted chocolate over the chocolate ganache, using a small offset spatula. Place in the freezer for 1 hour.

To cut the filling: Remove the layers from the freezer and gently flip onto a parchment paper-lined cutting board so the foot is face down and the fruit layer is on top. Gently peel off the plastic wrap. Using a sharp, nonserrated knife, trim all four edges. Use a ruler to mark the ganache on all four sides at 1-inch (2.5 cm) intervals. Match up the notches and cut the pieces into squares. Separate the squares onto parchment paper. Allow the squares to sit overnight at room temperature to dry.

To dip and decorate the chocolates: Dip squares into tempered chocolate (see instructions). Decorate as desired or sprinkle with fresh wasabi powder.

Making Artisan Chocolates © 2007 Andrew Garrison Shotts. Photo © Quarry Press. All rights reserved


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